Portfolio

Master Bathroom, Residence in Southeast Kansas

A  beautiful piece of empty land located in southeast Kansas provides the backdrop for a client’s new home.  The owners are from  Portland, Oregon and recently purchased a family farm in Kansas that they wished to use as a wildlife sanctuary.  The property sits among other nearby farms on ancient Osage Indian campgrounds.   Indian encampments near freshwater springs and buffalo herds existed for eons on the lands before white settlers appeared in the late 19th century.

The clients wanted to build a home that would reflect the surrounding community’s style, as well as withstand the numerous windstorms and tornadoes that blow through the area each year.  The home would  become headquarters for an international nature conservancy group in the future.

The master bath bears testimony to the owners’ love of hand made ceramic tile on the floor,  the sink counter surface and  back splash, and throughout the shower.  Even the sink was custom made and  installed in a cabinet that began its life as a piece of furniture.   All the tile is custom made, and reflects the owner’s appreciation of nature’s palette.  Wall-mounted lighting and sink hardware were also selected to blend in with the owner’s  tribute to their surroundings.

The walk-in shower is large enough for two people, and was designed to control water splash without a door.  A small, built-in stool stands ready for use in one corner of the shower.  It’s a perfect spot for shaving legs, or  resting beneath a stream of warm water after a grueling day working in the nearby vineyards.

 

Client Testimonial

Shirley was asked to develop the character of a barnhouse interior resembling Timberline Lodge and Woolaroc Lodge in Oklahoma for 80 acres deeded from the Osage Land Trust. Tile for 3 bathrooms and the kitchen were specially fired with designs of pond, buffalo, grasshopper and to match the barn red cupboards in the kitchen that I had always wanted. It was a very difficult project due to its remoteness and worker issues, but Shirley somehow pulled it together to perfection.
– Connie Tyson